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Home > Tyres > Tyre Labelling

What Is Tyre Labelling?Tyre labelling

In preparation for the introduction of a new European legislation on tyre labelling, we recently carried out a customer survey and almost 90% of motorists admitted they were unaware of tyre labelling legislation coming into place in 2012.

At ATS Euromaster, we believe that selecting the right tyre for a vehicle and meeting the customer's requirements will be simplified with the introduction of tyre labelling.

In our survey, over 90 per cent of respondents agreed, acknowledging that labelling would influence and aid them when purchasing tyres.

Our survey revealed that customers would be most likely to look for information on tyre labelling through the web, so we have launched a brand new and dedicated section of our website to proving our customers with more information about this topic.


Watch our tyre labelling video here

More Information

Tyre labelling what is it?

Tyres are critical to every part of a vehicle’s function – they impact on reliability, fuel efficiency and safety, stopping distances and noise reduction, not to mention the ability to cope with extreme weather (ice and snow) and poor road conditions.

Selecting the right tyre for your vehicle, and your requirements, means either prioritising your needs or choosing a tyre which offers good all-round performance in a number of key areas.

For example:

  • Some tyres would be specified for drivers concerned about road noise (or 'rolling noise' as it is sometimes called).
  • Some tyres are better for fuel economy.
  • Some tyres are better for high performance.
  • Some tyres perform well in each of these areas.
  • And budget brands would be recommended where the main concern was low cost.

The problem is that there is currently no objective, universal method of categorising tyres and explaining their features and benefits so that consumers – and the trade – can compare like with like quickly and easily.

The EU is setting out to solve that problem. From November 2012 a Europe-wide tyre labelling system will be introduced. However, it is expected that manufacturers will start introducing the system before that date.

This will help you and your local ATS Euromaster team to select precisely the right tyre for your specific  requirements.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

When will you see the labels?

You'll see them on pretty much all car and van tyres. Truck tyres will be graded too, tyres are critical to every part of a vehicle’s function - they impact on reliability, fuel efficiency and safety, stopping distances and noise reduction, not to mention the ability to cope with extreme weather (ice and snow) and poor road conditions.

Selecting the right tyre for your vehicle, and your requirements, means either prioritising your needs or choosing a tyre which offers good all-round performance in a number of key areas.

For example:  

  • Some tyres would be specified for drivers concerned about road noise (or 'rolling noise' as it is sometimes called).
  • Some tyres are better for fuel economy. Some tyres are better for high performance.
  • Some tyres perform well in each of these areas
  • And budget brands would be recommended where the main concern was low cost.
  • The problem is that there is currently no objective, universal method of categorising tyres and explaining their features and benefits so that consumers - and the trade - can compare like with like quickly and easily.

The EU is setting out to solve that problem. From November 2012 a Europe-wide tyre labelling system will be introduced.  However, it is expected that manufacturers will start introducing the system before that.

ATS Euromaster will ensure that you are able to view a copy of the tyre label before purchase to enable you to precisely select the correct tyre for your specific requirement. 

A copy of the tyre label information will also be provided to you after purchasing a new or replacement tyre so that you can refer to the tyre’s individual rating for future reference. 

There is no legal requirement for the tyre label to appear on the tyres supplied with a new car or van, unless there is a choice of tyres presented.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Who decides what's on the label?

The tyre manufacturer will be told what information must be included and they will be required to use an approved design.

The EU is particularly focusing on safety and environmental issues in its labelling and there will be three key criteria:

  • Rolling resistance (which has an impact on fuel consumption and CO2 emissions) comes from the deformation of the tyre as it contacts the road. On average it can absorb 20% of the energy used to move the vehicle; reducing rolling resistance means better fuel consumption
  • Wet grip (which affects safety)
  • Exterior rolling noise (sound pollution)

Tyre labelling won't include all tyres - specialist motorsport tyres, motorbike and pedal bike tyres and those made for vintage vehicles will be excluded, as will re-treads - but the vast majority of 'normal use' tyres sold for cars, vans, 4x4s, pick-ups and trucks, will be covered by the new system.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Are there any drawbacks to tyre labelling?

Well, it's a significant improvement on what we had, which was nothing at all!

It does have some shortcomings because it doesn't include everything. There are four notable exceptions which well-informed consumers, and ATS Euromaster staff, will be aware of:

  • The price of a tyre is on thing, but to judge whether or not it is good value, the buyer needs to know the projected life expectancy in miles. After all, a cheaper tyre that only lasts approximately 20,000 miles may be poor value compared to a more expensive tyre which lasts 30,000 miles.
  • The life of the tyre also affects its impact on the environment. A low-cost tyre which wears out faster costs the same amount of money to recycle as one which lasts twice as long. Therefore, fitting shorter-life tyres will mean more tyres to recycle.
  • The new labelling system takes wet grip into account but doesn't require a measure of wet grip when cornering, where in many cases it may be a more critical issue.
  • The system measures braking on wet roads, but not dry roads.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Do we approve of tyre labelling?

Yes we do. Any additional information and data for use by consumers is a good thing.

Tyre labelling will increase user awareness that all tyres are not equal and that some have better performance profiles.

Generally speaking, informed buyers buy better. That applies to anything, not just tyres, so more information means consumers are likely to make better choices.

It draws particular attention to the problems of low cost tyres, often referred to as budget fitments.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

How do I select the right tyres for me?

How do i select the right tyres for me?

Watch our tyre labelling video here

What's on the label - Rolling Resistance

In most cases car and van tyres will have actual labels stuck to the tread of each tyre, or included with each batch of tyres sold.

This information will include:

Rolling resistance (which impacts on fuel consumption):

  • There are seven categories of fuel efficiency on the new labels, although grade "D" is not used. Category "A" is the most efficient and means you will use the least amount of fuel for your journey.
  • A vehicle with four "A" graded tyres instead of "G" could reduce the fuel consumption by 7.5%*

Whatever the grade of tyre:

  • Carry out monthly tyre pressure checks, the corrent tyre pressure can be found in the vehicle's handbook and sometimes on a sticker on the door jam or fuel cap.
  • Tyres filled with normal air will lose pressure over time; filling with nitrogen reduceds the spedd of the pressure loss, and means you tyres stay at the correct (and most fuel-efficient) pressure for longer. We now also offer Nitrogen inflation click here to find out more.
  • Incorrect alignment can increase fuel consumption by 10% and leads to faster tyre wear. Have your wheel alignment checked once a year, and after any hard impact (such as hitting a pothole or kerb). Click here for Wheel Alignment.
  • Dirty filters and oxidised spark plugs can increase fuel consumption. Make sure you have your vehicle serviced in line with the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Engines with insufficient oil or poor quality oil work harder; cheap oil is a false economy as the engine will use more of it (and fuel consumption will rise). Check your oil level regularly. For more information on oil click here.

*When measured according to the test methods set out in Regulation (EC) No. 1222/2009, Source: European Commission Impact Assessment SEC (2008) 2860.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Wet grip performance:

Wet grip is an important safety aspect of a tyre as it affects how quickly you will be able to stop in wet conditions.

  • The braking distance of a vehicle travelling at 50mph, driving on a straight road covered with between 0.5 and 1.5mm of water is measured.
  • The labels go from A (teh shortest braking distance) to F for the longest.
  • There are no D and G grades for car and van tyres.
  • For a typical passenger car, driving on four of the same tyres, the difference between an "A" graded tyre and an "F" graded tyre is 30%. This is more than 18 metres at 50mph, which is equivalent to the length of more than 4 cars!*

Wet grip performance: what you should know!

  • Under inflated tyres will have diminished road contact and reduced tyre grip (even more so in the wet).
  • Brake fluid should be changed every two years. Brake pads do not work as well once they have worn beyond 50%; if not changed in time the discs may become damaged. For more on Brakes click here.
  • Shock absorbers provide stability in braking; performance may be impaired if they are faulty. For more information on shock absorbers click here.

*When measured according to the test methods set out in Regulation EC 1222/2009, source: European Commission’s Impact Assessment SEC (2008) 2860.

External Noise:

  • This is a measurement of the amount of external noise generated by the tyre on the road surface. This measure is included because of the effect that traffic has on noise pollution.
  • Below 30mph, most of the noise heard by a vehicle is engine noise, above that speed it is the noise that the tyres create that dominates.
  • For tyte labelling, the tests are carried out on a vehicle travelling at 50mph, engine switched off (freewheeling).
  • A tyre with three black waves is in compliance with current European regulation but will breech regulations to be introduced in 2016.
  • A tyre with 2 black waves is already in compliance with the 2016 regulations.

External Noise: What you should know!

  • The noise level is shown as a figure in decibels and a pictogram with the sound waves shaded - the more black waves, the noisier the tyre is.
  • A tyre with 3 black waves - noisier tyre*. The noise level compiles with current regulations but in future exceeds the minimum acceptable limits.
  • 2 black waves = average tyre*. This is where the noise level is equal to or below the future limits by up to 3 dB(A)
  • 1 black wave = low noise tyre*. This is a tyre with a noise level 3 dB(A) or more below the future noise limits

To put the level of noise into context, below are examples of some familiar noises**:

Rustling leaves = 20 dB(A)
Refrigerator = 50 dB(A)
Vacuum Cleaner = 120 dB(A)
Plane take off = 140 dB(A)

The scale of decibels is a logarithmic scale - an increase of 3dB is equivalent to doubling the sound

Click here to read our FAQ's for futher information on tyre labelling.

* Performance measured in accordance with the test methods set out by Regulation (EC) No. 1222/2009. Source: European Commission’s Impact Assessment SEC (2008) 2860

** from www.noisehelp.com/noise-level-chart.html.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Tyre Labelling Video

Tyre labelling what is it?

Tyres are critical to every part of a vehicle’s function – they impact on reliability, fuel efficiency and safety, stopping distances and noise reduction, not to mention the ability to cope with extreme weather (ice and snow) and poor road conditions.

Selecting the right tyre for your vehicle, and your requirements, means either prioritising your needs or choosing a tyre which offers good all-round performance in a number of key areas.

For example:

  • Some tyres would be specified for drivers concerned about road noise (or 'rolling noise' as it is sometimes called).
  • Some tyres are better for fuel economy.
  • Some tyres are better for high performance.
  • Some tyres perform well in each of these areas.
  • And budget brands would be recommended where the main concern was low cost.

The problem is that there is currently no objective, universal method of categorising tyres and explaining their features and benefits so that consumers – and the trade – can compare like with like quickly and easily.

The EU is setting out to solve that problem. From November 2012 a Europe-wide tyre labelling system will be introduced. However, it is expected that manufacturers will start introducing the system before that date.

This will help you and your local ATS Euromaster team to select precisely the right tyre for your specific  requirements.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

When will you see the labels?

You'll see them on pretty much all car and van tyres. Truck tyres will be graded too, tyres are critical to every part of a vehicle’s function - they impact on reliability, fuel efficiency and safety, stopping distances and noise reduction, not to mention the ability to cope with extreme weather (ice and snow) and poor road conditions.

Selecting the right tyre for your vehicle, and your requirements, means either prioritising your needs or choosing a tyre which offers good all-round performance in a number of key areas.

For example:  

  • Some tyres would be specified for drivers concerned about road noise (or 'rolling noise' as it is sometimes called).
  • Some tyres are better for fuel economy. Some tyres are better for high performance.
  • Some tyres perform well in each of these areas
  • And budget brands would be recommended where the main concern was low cost.
  • The problem is that there is currently no objective, universal method of categorising tyres and explaining their features and benefits so that consumers - and the trade - can compare like with like quickly and easily.

The EU is setting out to solve that problem. From November 2012 a Europe-wide tyre labelling system will be introduced.  However, it is expected that manufacturers will start introducing the system before that.

ATS Euromaster will ensure that you are able to view a copy of the tyre label before purchase to enable you to precisely select the correct tyre for your specific requirement. 

A copy of the tyre label information will also be provided to you after purchasing a new or replacement tyre so that you can refer to the tyre’s individual rating for future reference. 

There is no legal requirement for the tyre label to appear on the tyres supplied with a new car or van, unless there is a choice of tyres presented.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Who decides what's on the label?

The tyre manufacturer will be told what information must be included and they will be required to use an approved design.

The EU is particularly focusing on safety and environmental issues in its labelling and there will be three key criteria:

  • Rolling resistance (which has an impact on fuel consumption and CO2 emissions) comes from the deformation of the tyre as it contacts the road. On average it can absorb 20% of the energy used to move the vehicle; reducing rolling resistance means better fuel consumption
  • Wet grip (which affects safety)
  • Exterior rolling noise (sound pollution)

Tyre labelling won't include all tyres - specialist motorsport tyres, motorbike and pedal bike tyres and those made for vintage vehicles will be excluded, as will re-treads - but the vast majority of 'normal use' tyres sold for cars, vans, 4x4s, pick-ups and trucks, will be covered by the new system.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Are there any drawbacks to tyre labelling?

Well, it's a significant improvement on what we had, which was nothing at all!

It does have some shortcomings because it doesn't include everything. There are four notable exceptions which well-informed consumers, and ATS Euromaster staff, will be aware of:

  • The price of a tyre is on thing, but to judge whether or not it is good value, the buyer needs to know the projected life expectancy in miles. After all, a cheaper tyre that only lasts approximately 20,000 miles may be poor value compared to a more expensive tyre which lasts 30,000 miles.
  • The life of the tyre also affects its impact on the environment. A low-cost tyre which wears out faster costs the same amount of money to recycle as one which lasts twice as long. Therefore, fitting shorter-life tyres will mean more tyres to recycle.
  • The new labelling system takes wet grip into account but doesn't require a measure of wet grip when cornering, where in many cases it may be a more critical issue.
  • The system measures braking on wet roads, but not dry roads.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Do we approve of tyre labelling?

Yes we do. Any additional information and data for use by consumers is a good thing.

Tyre labelling will increase user awareness that all tyres are not equal and that some have better performance profiles.

Generally speaking, informed buyers buy better. That applies to anything, not just tyres, so more information means consumers are likely to make better choices.

It draws particular attention to the problems of low cost tyres, often referred to as budget fitments.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

How do I select the right tyres for me?

How do i select the right tyres for me?

Watch our tyre labelling video here

What's on the label - Rolling Resistance

In most cases car and van tyres will have actual labels stuck to the tread of each tyre, or included with each batch of tyres sold.

This information will include:

Rolling resistance (which impacts on fuel consumption):

  • There are seven categories of fuel efficiency on the new labels, although grade "D" is not used. Category "A" is the most efficient and means you will use the least amount of fuel for your journey.
  • A vehicle with four "A" graded tyres instead of "G" could reduce the fuel consumption by 7.5%*

Whatever the grade of tyre:

  • Carry out monthly tyre pressure checks, the corrent tyre pressure can be found in the vehicle's handbook and sometimes on a sticker on the door jam or fuel cap.
  • Tyres filled with normal air will lose pressure over time; filling with nitrogen reduceds the spedd of the pressure loss, and means you tyres stay at the correct (and most fuel-efficient) pressure for longer. We now also offer Nitrogen inflation click here to find out more.
  • Incorrect alignment can increase fuel consumption by 10% and leads to faster tyre wear. Have your wheel alignment checked once a year, and after any hard impact (such as hitting a pothole or kerb). Click here for Wheel Alignment.
  • Dirty filters and oxidised spark plugs can increase fuel consumption. Make sure you have your vehicle serviced in line with the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Engines with insufficient oil or poor quality oil work harder; cheap oil is a false economy as the engine will use more of it (and fuel consumption will rise). Check your oil level regularly. For more information on oil click here.

*When measured according to the test methods set out in Regulation (EC) No. 1222/2009, Source: European Commission Impact Assessment SEC (2008) 2860.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Wet grip performance:

Wet grip is an important safety aspect of a tyre as it affects how quickly you will be able to stop in wet conditions.

  • The braking distance of a vehicle travelling at 50mph, driving on a straight road covered with between 0.5 and 1.5mm of water is measured.
  • The labels go from A (teh shortest braking distance) to F for the longest.
  • There are no D and G grades for car and van tyres.
  • For a typical passenger car, driving on four of the same tyres, the difference between an "A" graded tyre and an "F" graded tyre is 30%. This is more than 18 metres at 50mph, which is equivalent to the length of more than 4 cars!*

Wet grip performance: what you should know!

  • Under inflated tyres will have diminished road contact and reduced tyre grip (even more so in the wet).
  • Brake fluid should be changed every two years. Brake pads do not work as well once they have worn beyond 50%; if not changed in time the discs may become damaged. For more on Brakes click here.
  • Shock absorbers provide stability in braking; performance may be impaired if they are faulty. For more information on shock absorbers click here.

*When measured according to the test methods set out in Regulation EC 1222/2009, source: European Commission’s Impact Assessment SEC (2008) 2860.

External Noise:

  • This is a measurement of the amount of external noise generated by the tyre on the road surface. This measure is included because of the effect that traffic has on noise pollution.
  • Below 30mph, most of the noise heard by a vehicle is engine noise, above that speed it is the noise that the tyres create that dominates.
  • For tyte labelling, the tests are carried out on a vehicle travelling at 50mph, engine switched off (freewheeling).
  • A tyre with three black waves is in compliance with current European regulation but will breech regulations to be introduced in 2016.
  • A tyre with 2 black waves is already in compliance with the 2016 regulations.

External Noise: What you should know!

  • The noise level is shown as a figure in decibels and a pictogram with the sound waves shaded - the more black waves, the noisier the tyre is.
  • A tyre with 3 black waves - noisier tyre*. The noise level compiles with current regulations but in future exceeds the minimum acceptable limits.
  • 2 black waves = average tyre*. This is where the noise level is equal to or below the future limits by up to 3 dB(A)
  • 1 black wave = low noise tyre*. This is a tyre with a noise level 3 dB(A) or more below the future noise limits

To put the level of noise into context, below are examples of some familiar noises**:

Rustling leaves = 20 dB(A)
Refrigerator = 50 dB(A)
Vacuum Cleaner = 120 dB(A)
Plane take off = 140 dB(A)

The scale of decibels is a logarithmic scale - an increase of 3dB is equivalent to doubling the sound

Click here to read our FAQ's for futher information on tyre labelling.

* Performance measured in accordance with the test methods set out by Regulation (EC) No. 1222/2009. Source: European Commission’s Impact Assessment SEC (2008) 2860

** from www.noisehelp.com/noise-level-chart.html.

Watch our tyre labelling video here

Tyre Labelling Video

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